Men of Whom the World Was Not Worthy


“On Wednesday April 18 many people in America were still focused on the aftermath of the massacre at Virginia Tech and had already moved on to inane debates about who to blame (besides the gunman) for the awful tragedy there. On the same day in Turkey, 46 year old German missionary Tilman Geske made his way to his office along with two other Turkish Christians, Necati Aydin and Ugur Yuksel. The three men were heading to a previously arranged bible study with some Islamic “seekers” who had expressed interest in the Christian faith.”
Read the article

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Dever with Thabiti Anyabwile (for real)


I recently posted this, but I don’t think anyone listened to the interview because the link I posted was bad and no one told me about it… I just finished this up and it is excellent. Personally, I don’t have one Muslim friend. I have never shared the gospel with one. This message is convicting and timely. Please take the time to listen to it, get the books I have linked, and volunteer to help an immigrant Muslim.

Listen to the Interview
# 1 The Prophet and the Messiah

#2 Cross and Crescent


A place to start looking for volunteering opportunities?

Pinocchio has Converted


(ht: Albert Mohler)

The Telegraph is reporting that Pinocchio has become a muslim. Here’s what Al Mohler has to say about it.

Where will this end? What if Huckleberry Finn becomes a Buddhist? [“Honest, Injun Joe, all I desire now is the absence of all desire. Honest“] What if Aunt Polly becomes a Christian Scientist? [“Don’t worry about that gunshot dear, pain and illness are only illusions.”] What if Jiminy Cricket becomes a Zoroastrian? It would give “When You Wish Upon a Star” a whole new meaning.

The literature of the West acknowledges the existence of non-Christians. The literature of the Islamic world does not acknowledge the existence of non-Muslims in the same way. Pinocchio must convert. That is a distinction worth reflection.”

Complete Series: When Witnessing to Muslims

SAVE THIS LINK

Thabiti Anyabwile is one of my favorite bloggers and a converted Muslim (and incidentally Challies King for a Week – I’m calling that a personal victory). His series is completed on Witnessing to Muslims. This would be a good one to print and keep.

When Witnessing to Muslims… Know the Gospel

When Witnessing to Muslims… Renounce Fear

When Witnessing to Muslims… Defend the Bible

When Witnessing to Muslims… Get Personal

When Witnessing to Muslims… Get to Jesus

When Witnessing to Muslims… Get to Jesus (2)

When Witnessing to Muslims… Be Hospitable

When Witnessing to Muslims… Remember…

Perhaps the greatest challenge to effective gospel outreach to Muslim friends and neighbors is fear. It’s sometimes a subtle fear that appears in our assumptions (“they won’t be interested” or “it’s useless trying to reach out”) and sometimes appears in more visceral ways. But fear pervades our interactions with men and women who practice Islam.

But God did not give us a spirit of fear or timidity but of power, of love, and of self-discipline (2 Tim. 1:7). This truth needs desperately to be remembered when evangelism and Muslim are used in the same breath.

There are four fears that most Christians tend to experience when it comes to sharing the Gospel with Muslims.

1. Fear of Terrorists: Let’s face it; a great number of us think “terrorist” or “potential terrorist” when we see an Arab, in general, and an Arab Muslim in particular. The images that inform this fear are plentiful: images of 9/11, of bearded men with head scarves, of angry Arabs protesting cartoons, of masked militia wielding automatic weapons and rocket launchers, of young Arab boys throwing Molotov cocktails and rocks at tanks, of dreaded suicide bombers maiming and killing bystanders and civilians.

The almost daily deluge of these images fills us with suspicion and fear and causes us to hesitate in sharing, lest we talk with an actual terrorist and somehow end up on their “hit list.” This fear blinds us to the person’s great need of a Savior by focusing us on ourselves, our vain lust for security and safety. So, what if the person is a terrorist? Aren’t we better of rejoicing at the prospect of speaking with a terrorist and by God’s omnipotent aid actually seeing them converted from such hate-filled darkness to the joy and love-filled light of Christ? The Christian’s “war against terror” is the warfare we wage to spread the gospel to all—including folks we fear might be terrorists.

Please Read on

When Witnessing to Muslims

SAVE THIS LINK
Thabiti Anyabwile is quickly becoming one of my favorite bloggers. His series is completed on Witnessing to Muslims. This would be a good one to print and keep.

When Witnessing to Muslims… Know the Gospel

When Witnessing to Muslims… Renounce Fear

When Witnessing to Muslims… Defend the Bible

When Witnessing to Muslims… Get Personal

When Witnessing to Muslims… Get to Jesus

When Witnessing to Muslims… Get to Jesus (2)

When Witnessing to Muslims… Be Hospitable

When Witnessing to Muslims… Remember…

Perhaps the greatest challenge to effective gospel outreach to Muslim friends and neighbors is fear. It’s sometimes a subtle fear that appears in our assumptions (“they won’t be interested” or “it’s useless trying to reach out”) and sometimes appears in more visceral ways. But fear pervades our interactions with men and women who practice Islam.

But God did not give us a spirit of fear or timidity but of power, of love, and of self-discipline (2 Tim. 1:7). This truth needs desperately to be remembered when evangelism and Muslim are used in the same breath.

There are four fears that most Christians tend to experience when it comes to sharing the Gospel with Muslims.

1. Fear of Terrorists: Let’s face it; a great number of us think “terrorist” or “potential terrorist” when we see an Arab, in general, and an Arab Muslim in particular. The images that inform this fear are plentiful: images of 9/11, of bearded men with head scarves, of angry Arabs protesting cartoons, of masked militia wielding automatic weapons and rocket launchers, of young Arab boys throwing Molotov cocktails and rocks at tanks, of dreaded suicide bombers maiming and killing bystanders and civilians.

The almost daily deluge of these images fills us with suspicion and fear and causes us to hesitate in sharing, lest we talk with an actual terrorist and somehow end up on their “hit list.” This fear blinds us to the person’s great need of a Savior by focusing us on ourselves, our vain lust for security and safety. So, what if the person is a terrorist? Aren’t we better of rejoicing at the prospect of speaking with a terrorist and by God’s omnipotent aid actually seeing them converted from such hate-filled darkness to the joy and love-filled light of Christ? The Christian’s “war against terror” is the warfare we wage to spread the gospel to all—including folks we fear might be terrorists.

Please Read on